How to set up a WeChat business account for your tourism brand

For those new to the Chinese market, WeChat might seem confusing. However with many Western social media platforms being inaccessible in China, WeChat takes centre stage. If you’re asking what WeChat is, what you can do on it, how big it is, look no further. We’ve put together a little introductory guide to WeChat for you.

WeChat explained

WeChat is a mobile text and voice messaging communication service. In just six short years since its release in 2011, it has become one of the largest standalone messaging apps in the world, rivalling Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp. In the first quarter of 2017, WeChat had 938 million monthly active users, a 28% growth year-on-year. And according to China Skinny, “WeChat’s reach and influence is unrivalled in China’s online space”, perhaps because the app allows users to do so much more than just messaging.

‘Moments’ is the popular sharing function on WeChat, similar to Facebook updates. You can upload pictures, post updates and videos. WeChat’s blog, Chatterbox, is a good place for technical tips on using WeChat.

Users are also able to manage their lives through WeChat. It starts simply enough with playing games, catching up on current affairs, buying film tickets, ordering food and taxis. Then it steps up a gear with in-store payments and online shopping, paying bills, transferring money, and even booking flights. You name it, WeChat probably does it. The key to WeChat’s success may lie in its ability to attract millennials. In September 2015, 60% of users were 15-29 years old. Perhaps this young and dynamic following are the reason why WeChat offers so many different functions and, as a result, have nurtured WeChat’s capacity to innovate and grow. It’s no wonder that WeChat is a powerhouse. Having taken over China, its next step is to take over the world.

Using WeChat for work

Despite their best efforts, Facebook and LinkedIn have never quite been able to catch up with WeChat’s status in the business world. Yes – LinkedIn is specifically used to build professional networks but it hasn’t successfully managed to embed itself into the daily workflow in the same way, and WeChat is becoming an increasingly more common workplace tool. In fact, 87.7% of 20,000+ Chinese web users would place WeChat as their choice app for daily work communication, even beating phones and emails; a staggering number. At China Travel Outbound, we use WeChat to share documents, images and presentations and we abandoned Skype as a method to communicate with China long ago. Now all our team calls with Beijing are made on WeChat. It’s far more stable and the app makes it simple to operate group calls.

According to the Financial Times, “at almost every Chinese workplace, WeChat has become the primary means of communication”. For instance, 57% of new contacts that are added every month are work-related, with family and friends being next on the list at just over 20%. This is a huge difference and is evidence of WeChat’s power in the workplace, so much so that according to Xue Yu, a senior market analyst with IDC China, “WeChat is becoming WeWork”.

Not only that, but WeChat is also used for a myriad of other workplace functions. Coordinating and arranging tasks is top of the list with 50%; sending notifications, making transactions and arranging tasks are next on the list, whereas having meetings and conference calls and marketing purposes are lower down. Then again, it’s only a matter of time. WeChat’s next challenge? To go beyond being used only for workplace communication purposes and become an essential part of the daily workflow. And, perhaps, that will happen sooner rather than later. The majority of Chinese office workers have been said to find WeChat a helpful working tool, with nearly all of the 90% who are regular WeChat work users finding value in the platform.

Using WeChat to promote your European travel or tourism brand to the Chinese

This is where things get a bit more tricky. You have done your research and recognised the importance of WeChat, and you’ve decided you want to set up a WeChat account for your tourism attraction, tour operation or hotel. So you try to set up a WeChat business account. And there is your problem. You can’t set up a WeChat business account which can be accessed by mainland Chinese unless you have a Chinese business licence.

So what are your options?

Option One

Commit to a one-off spend on WeChat advertising of around €25,000. In return, WeChat’s head office will authorise your account.

Option Two

Find a Chinese third party agency which is willing to allow you to use one of its WeChat licences to host your account. They will charge you for the privilege but, more importantly, they will have control of your account. It is important you trust them, have an ongoing relationship with them and, preferably, some kind of written agreement which would deliver the account to you in the event of a split (although contracts in UK law are likely to be of limited use to you in the event of a breakdown in a relationship with a Chinese agency.)

It is worth noting, however, that there is a limit on the number of WeChat accounts that a Chinese business can own. And once one has been allocated to you, it can not be closed down and allocated to someone else. Also, if the third party agency  allows the client to post freely on the account, it is running a risk (albeit potentially a small one) that the client could post something controversial in the eyes of the Chinese government. Social media is tightly monitored in China and the wrong post on WeChat could, potentially, lead to the revocation of the Chinese agency’s business licence. That is why we, at China Travel Outbound, will only consider licensing a WeChat business account to retained clients with whom we have worked for a while, and whom we feel confident are committed to the market. We also insist on editorial control over content, just to keep an eye on things.

If a third party agency is managing your WeChat account, we urge you to double check what plans are in place should you (or the agency) decide you no longer wish to continue the arrangement.

Option Three

Use a personal WeChat account instead. This is not recommended for prestigious tourism brands as it does not give the right impression. The management information from it is also very limited, but at least you will be able to communicate with your customers and you will be able to have full control of your own account.

Option Four

Wait. WeChat is moving so quickly that the rules may change as it seeks to replicate its success in China throughout the world. Or hop over to Weibo.

One final point. Before you decide you need a WeChat account, do make sure it is the right thing to do. It takes time to build followers on WeChat and you might be better off, particularly in the medium term, to use PR, bloggers, and customer interactions to ‘piggyback’ onto the existing accounts of other influencers. It’s going to be far more beneficial for you if a Chinese celebrity endorses your brand to three hundred thousand followers, than if you post an article to three hundred.

If you would like to find out more about WeChat, please get in touch.

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How to attract Chinese tourists to your destination

As Chinese outbound tourists travel further and more frequently, competition to attract these high-spending visitors intensifies. From the China-Australia Tourism Year to Mandarin-speaking wine educators in California’s Napa Valley, sometimes it seems as if every destination, visitor attraction and hotel chain is targeting Chinese tourists.

And yet the number of destinations which truly excel in appealing to the Chinese is small. That means there’s a great opportunity for savvy destinations to sneak ahead of their competitors in the Chinese tourism stakes. There is still time to make your destination Chinese-friendly and to make it known amongst this most valuable of target markets.

Here are China Travel Outbound’s top tips for making your destination appealing to the Chinese.

Make yourself attractive to the Chinese before departure

The average Chinese tourist plans and researches their trip almost 3 months in advance, with 43% consulting travel, shopping and fashion websites and 38% using brand channels on social media. To get in front of this audience, you must have some kind of presence on WeChat and Weibo, indispensable social media platforms for the Chinese. You can do this via your own social media accounts, or by using someone else’s and tapping into their influence and their friends and fans.  The digital space is great for promoting your destination; use rich video showcasing its experiential offer or get the support of a Chinese vlogger or KOL.

Make sure the Chinese travel trade know you are there

The vast majority of  bookings overseas from China are still made via travel agents and tour operators, so even if you are targeting the FITs, you still need the Chinese travel trade to sell your destination. Connect with them through trade shows, via DMCs, trade PR or using the services of an in-market representative. Or, ideally, all of the above.

Welcome your Chinese visitors in Mandarin

You don’t have to undertake extensive cultural training to make your Chinese guests feel welcome. Just learning a few key phrases in Mandarin and understanding frequent requests is useful. All the better if you have fluent Mandarin speakers to say ‘ni hao’ to your Chinese arrivals.

Flights to Las Vegas from Hainan are greeted by bilingual ‘ambassadors’ who welcome travellers and help with directions. Tourism Tasmania has started hiring bilingual guides at its most popular national parks. If your Chinese visitor numbers are still small, signage (when used well) and literature can provide a practical and affordable alternative. When China Southern introduced direct flights between Guangzhou and Adelaide, Adelaide rolled out directional signage in Chinese.

Make it easy for your tourism businesses to be Chinese-friendly

Work with your tourism businesses to create a fully Chinese-friendly destination. Chinese tourism has brought £43m to Scotland over the last 3 years and Edinburgh’s Tourism Action Group offers comprehensive support, advice and training to help its tourism businesses to attract, and welcome, Chinese visitors. Work with your service providers to implement some entry-level Chinese-friendly innovations, such as signage in Mandarin and a simplified, translated menu at restaurants, and build your Chinese offering from there. We offer China Ready Training through our partners at Capela China. One day workshops for up to 10 people can get your business ready to accept and welcome Chinese guests and help you navigate the cultural challenges of working with China.

Rice and the new wave of Chinese food tourism

Chinese restaurants continue to be attractive to Chinese tourists but those offering other cuisines stand a better chance of attracting the new wave of Chinese food tourists if there’s upfront information in Chinese. Offering rice as an accompaniment to any cuisine will make the Chinese feel ‘at home’ too. The big sellers at the seafood restaurants in Brighton we work with are the risottos, the seafood spaghettis, oysters, and the huge, shareable, seafood platters including lobster, crab and other shellfish. Sharing is the norm and, as a rule, hot food trumps cold.

Communal dining is important to the Chinese, and deft cultural touches such as according the highest respect to the oldest person in the party – which might seem counter-intuitive when the most fluent English speaker is younger – is the kind of attention to detail which garners positive reviews on Chinese social media sites.

It’s easier for the Chinese to shop if they can pay

The Chinese don’t use Western credit cards and don’t want to carry large amounts of cash, so try to offer the most popular Chinese payment options: China Union Pay, Alipay and WeChat Wallet. These online payment platforms are ubiquitous in China and savvy overseas destinations and retailers, including Harrods and Body Shop in London, are reaping the rewards of early adoption.

Adapt to changing Chinese tourism trends

It’s not just one big group market. Independent travel is on the rise and self-drive, Airbnb and caravanning are seeing increasing take-up too. Chinese millennials are a force to be reckoned with and this group of digital natives, in particular, are self-assured and confident about making their own travel arrangements.

Make sure your website and destination information is available to the Chinese – and not just in straight translation but in formats, design and wording which meet Chinese needs. Destination websites should also be hosted in Hong Kong or mainland China so they can be viewed in China. Remember that Google is banned in China, so if your website is packed with Google features, such as Google maps, it won’t upload easily in China. These functions need to be stripped out.

Experiential travel is on the up for Chinese tourists, with heritage products and experiences finding favour for their novelty as well as their WOW factor for social media. Some of Washington State’s most popular products are rural experiences including fishing and spending time in nature, and visitors to Japan are shunning shopping in favour of hot springs and sand baths. What authentic heritage experiences and products can you highlight to the Chinese?

Make it easy for the Chinese to recommend you

Make WiFi as widely available as possible so that your Chinese visitors can share their experiences in real time on social media. And make sure you monitor and respond to comments on social media review sites such as Mafengwo and DaoDao. This will give you invaluable insight into what the Chinese like and don’t like about your destination and its hotels, attractions and restaurants.

Lobby for easy access to your country

Make visas easy to buy and widely available in China to individual travellers. Better still, make visas purchasable on arrival, or allow accredited tour companies to process visa applications in advance for group travellers. Precisely this change last year saw South Africa grow its Chinese visitors by +53%.

Introduce a multi-year, multiple entry visa. Australia is trailing a 10-year multiple entry visa for Chinese visitors as part of a package of China-Australia Tourism Year initiatives in 2017.  Don’t get left behind; if it’s difficult for the Chinese to enter your country, lobby your government for easier access. The sheer size of the Chinese tourism opportunity is reason enough for more open entrance policies.

Don’t forget the Chinese who are already here

The Chinese value overseas education highly and, in particular, the USA and the UK. There are over 130,000 Chinese students studying in the UK, all of whom see this experience as an investment in their future and are keen to explore. They also have access to important social networks both in the UK and back home in China. To tap into these networks, China Travel Outbound has launched a new Student VIP Travel programme, making connections with the Presidents of the Chinese Student Societies of the UK’s universities and inviting these important influencers to experience our clients’ products.

Put Chinese-friendliness at the heart of your strategy

Don’t be half-hearted about attracting the Chinese market. It’s the biggest outbound tourism market in the world and it’s growing the fastest too. But you need to invest and be committed to get a return – and it requires special, expert attention from professionals with thorough knowledge of China and its travel market.

The rewards are considerable. By marketing differently to the Chinese, Las Vegas has grown a whole new audience of Chinese millennials not interested in casinos, benefiting other tourist attractions as Chinese visitors spend on dining, shopping and leisure activities instead. High-end Chinese tourists visiting Perth in Western Australia are spending up to AU$10,000 on a week’s luxury travel in the state.

Are you ready to start your journey to attract the Chinese to your destination?

 

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How to reach Chinese millennials? Get online.

In last week’s blog, we looked at the habits and demographics of 300 million Chinese millennials. Here, we look more closely at what travel and tourism brands can do to reach them.

It has been said that Chinese millennials “don’t go online, they live online”. Unsurprisingly, this tech-savvy cohort researches travel online, and likes reams of information about destinations, including experiences and where to eat/drink/shop. They like to decide exactly what they want to see and do before they depart, making it vital for destinations, hotels and visitor attractions to promote their offering in China in order to secure a space on millennials’ travel itineraries.

This segment has a research and booking window of 4-6 weeks before departure. WeChat is key: almost half of Chinese millennials get travel information through WeChat moments and 35% from WeChat shares by travel advisors. Weibo is also important. Supported by native advertising, the digital space is extremely well-placed to reach Chinese millennials planning travel. Melia hotels encourage online interaction through beautiful visuals and engaged nearly 1m Chinese travellers via WeChat and Weibo in 2015.

Key Opinion Leaders and public relations

Key Opinion Leaders and tastemakers are extremely influential for this group. From major celebrity partnerships to controversial blogger Papi Jiang for Jaeger LeCoultre and L’Oreal, and China Travel Outbound’s own work to bring Chinese rock group Miserable Faith to the original Hard Rock Cafe in London, gaining the right celebrity endorsement is a chance to bring your product to just the right millennial fan base. The Regency Restaurant in Brighton has benefitted from the endorsement of a Chinese food blogger while The Plough at Cadsden, host to David Cameron and President Xi Jinping in October 2015, has been visited by so many Chinese that it’s now been bought by Chinese investors.

Edinburgh brought 6 influential travel bloggers to Hogmanay in 2015. The resulting content has been viewed over 20 million times in China.

WiFi, websites and live streaming

39% of Chinese millennial travellers say they can’t go 5 minutes without looking at their mobile ‘phone, so mobile-friendly, responsive websites are essential for this demographic. And Chinese websites are not just a matter of translation; they must be structured, designed and written to meet Chinese needs. They also need to be hosted in China and to load speedily.

Live-streaming provides an opportunity for travel products to showcase their highlights. The right live streaming event with an influential Key Opinion Leader (KOL) could provide great cut-through for destinations willing to invest in this market to gain a lead on their rivals.

In destination marketing

Even if you haven’t managed to reach the travelling millennials until they’ve arrived in destination, all is not lost. Geographic targeting via WeChat can put your product in front of tourists adding the final hotels and restaurants to their itineraries. Shopping destinations and luxury brands can promote themselves using QR codes instore too.

130,000 students are already here

And finally, don’t forget the huge opportunity presented by the vast and growing Chinese student population here in the UK. With an estimated 130,000 Chinese students, the UK is one of the most popular choices for overseas study. And these affluent and educated young people want to explore, not just the UK, but the rest of Europe whilst they have this opportunity. Connect to them through WeChat or Weibo, or speak to China Travel Outbound about our connections to the influential Chinese Societies.

To find out more about how to market your destination, visitor attraction or hotel to the Chinese, contact us and we’ll talk you through some options.

 

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Chinese students in the UK: a missed tourism opportunity?

China is the world’s biggest source of international students and it’s estimated that nearly 1 million Chinese are currently studying overseas.  Formerly the preserve of the elite – President Li Xinping’s own daughter studied at Harvard – overseas study is increasingly affordable to China’s growing middle class, who may make considerable sacrifices to grant their only child a foreign university education.  1 in 6 overseas students is Chinese, and yet the tourism potential of this group in the UK has hardly begun to be explored.

It’s estimated that nearly 1 million Chinese are currently studying abroad, and China’s Ministry of Education reports that over 500,000 Chinese went overseas to study in 2015 alone.  In the same year the 58,000 Chinese enrolling for their first year at UK universities outnumbered the total number of students from the 27 countries of the EU doing the same.  And while they are usually embarking upon their overseas adventure entirely independently, a few are even accompanied by their (‘tiger’) mothers in an intercontinental version of helicopter parenting.

Chinese overseas students are fueling a property boom too.  In some areas of California, the majority of new-build housing is bought by Chinese, and total Chinese real estate purchases in the USA were valued at US$110bn in 2015. Whispers abound that London’s new build luxury housing stock is being snapped up by Chinese purchasers – and while that may be the case, only one London university makes the top 10 by Chinese student numbers.

The educational and cultural lure of Liverpool and Manchester

Chinese students make up around 4% of the student body in the UK.  A strong academic tradition and established university system combine with history and Royal glamour to tempt Chinese undergraduates to the Land of Fish and Chips.  Perennial favourite Sherlock Holmes plays a part too, not least because his latest impersonator Curly Foo (as Benedict Cumberbatch is known in Mandarin) sits squarely within the tradition of the English gentleman.

The perhaps surprising geographical spread of Chinese students in the UK sees a preference for universities in the Midlands and the North, with the universities of Liverpool and Manchester the top draws. The capital has only one representative, University College of London, in the top 10 by number of Chinese students.

A missed tourism opportunity?

Little attention so far has been paid to the significant tourism opportunity posed by Chinese students studying in the UK. This is perhaps surprising given their numbers, average length of stay of 2-4 years and curiosity to visit attractions in their host country.  We asked Mei Si, a student at Brighton University, for her insight into UK-based Chinese students’ travel.

One potentially lucrative aspect of Chinese students’ travel is the trip made by their parents for graduation, which usually takes place in the June to July or December to January period. This is the most likely time for Chinese parents to visit their offspring studying overseas and they’re keen to see the sights of the UK, on trips which can last from a few days to a couple of months. The Chinese student organises and books the trip which is likely to include some traditional sights such as Big Ben and luxury shops, but there is also space for other destinations – providing the Chinese student is aware of them.

Chinese students, like their home-based counterparts, are greatly influenced by reviews and recommendations in Chinese media and social media. Reaching Chinese students, even once in the UK, depends on cultivating positive coverage in Chinese media. The unexpected success of Brighton’s Regency Seafood Restaurant underlines the enormous returns which can come from just one celebrity endorsement in China, and small product adaptations, for instance Mandarin signage, information and audioguides, can make a big difference when it comes to garnering a following in China.

We can help to promote your product in China and raise your profile on social media. Contact us for a chat – we’d love to hear from you.

 

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An insight into the travel of Chinese students living in the UK

Guest blog by Mei Si, a Chinese student at the University of Brighton.

Do parents visit during the year?

June – July, and December – January are the hot seasons for Chinese parents to visit their children’s graduation ceremonies. Chinese parents are more likely to visit the UK only once in their time at university for their children’s graduation ceremony. They normally stay around few days to two months. It depends on their work time.

How do Chinese students book their flight to their UK Universities?

There are two main ways for Chinese students to book their flights to their Universities: Chinese travel agencies and airlines. Baidu, tuniu and qyer are some of the most popular travel agencies in China, although there are a wide range of international travel agency websites in the market. Chinese students, however seem more comfortable to use the websites they are familiar with.

Do they stay in hotels booked from China? What do they do when they get to UK?

When it comes to travel abroad, Chinese parents tend to rely on their children about organising travel plan because of the language barrier and the cultural differences between China and the UK. Chinese students would usually organise hotels, flights as well as travel plans for their parents on Chinese travel agency websites. These websites occasionally offer some fixed package deals to attract customers e.g. a 14 day UK trip including around tickets, 13 night hotels and some UK attractions’ discount tickets.

In addition, one of the features of these websites are blogs of travellers who share their unique travel plans about where they shop, eat and visit in the UK. Also, there are some recommendations about hotels and flights. It can give the consumers some ideas about where to bring their parents to visit.

It is a must to visit all the attractions and main shopping centres in the UK (Big Ben, London Bridge, British Museum, Oxbridge Universities, Oxford Bicester Village, London Burberry outlet etc) but always with their children. Parents who have children studying in the UK would definitely visit.

Considerations when choosing places to visit

When considering places, price is not the most important factor. Reviews and recommendations in Chinese have far greater reach.

In terms of eating out, Chinese families visiting would often eat from Chinese restaurants, as many do not like the typical dishes served, especially the cold dishes, and would rather eat familiar foods.

Despite this, visiting Chinese families would often try food recommended in blogs and reports, including famous establishments like Burger & Lobster, Duck & Waffle, both in London and Riddle & Finns in Brighton.

In conclusion, it seems that Chinese students’ preferences and advice from Chinese travel agencies’ blogs are the main factors which influence Chinese parents’ travel plans in the UK.

 

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Social Media marketing in China – where to begin

Where do you start?  Well, not with Facebook, Twitter or Youtube, which are all banned in China!  But before you remove   “write Chinese social media plan” from your ‘to do’ list, you might want to pause and read on a little; social media marketing is more critical in China than in any other market in the world. Here’s why:

1. Social media is huge in China!
China is the most active social media market in the world with over 500 million having a social media account (and the vast majority of these having more than one supplier).

2. Social media is a key source for decision making in China
In a market where many are sceptical of institutional messages, peer-led social media comment is a huge opinion shaper. According to the German Consultancy company Z Punkt,  48% of Chinese consumers are using social media in their travel planning.  

3. Chinese actively use social media to ‘interact’ with brands
66% of Chinese social media “interact” with brands (Insites Consulting) and  61% of Chinese would write about positive experiences and 53% about negative  experiences; this compares with 36% and 29% with Americans (Edelman Digital).
social media in ChinaSo, with Facebook and Twitter out of the picture, just who are the social media players in China? Unlike the west,  China’s social-media sector is fragmented and regional.  All the key players share some characteristics of their western counterparts, though they are often hybrids of the same.
In microblogging (or weibo), for example,  Sina Weibo and Tencent Qzone are the closest equivalents to Twitter.  The instant messaging market is increasingly dominated by Wechat, who have rapidly grown in recent years at the expense of Renren.  However Renren continue to play a big role in the field of mobile communication and private social networking apps, particularly amongst the student population.  Finally, in the video sharing market, Youku and Tudou are the closest equivalent to YouTube.

Competition in this market is ferocious with the ground is constantly shifting. For marketeers, the fragmentation increases the complexity of the social media landscape, but the basic rules of social media marketing in the west hold true in China.  However, you will need partners on the ground in China to help guide you, and provide real time responses to your customers.

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Kathy, Vivienne and Lily from the CTO team in Beijing,

At China Travel Outbound, we can help you with your Chinese social media strategy and implement and manage your Chinese social media accounts on your behalf.  We will communicate in real time, in a tone appropriate both to your brand and to your customer base in China, with regular posts, tweets and updates.  We can provide you with recommendations on promotions and competitions, create video and write copy on your behalf.  At our monthly account management meetings, we will provide you with an overview of how your brand is performing in China as a result of our activity on your behalf.

 

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Five tips for using PR to build your travel brand in China

With a population of 1.3 billion, and a land mass approximately the size of Europe, marketing your travel brand efficiently in China can be a daunting task. This is where a targeted, well executed PR strategy as part of a wider marketing plan comes to the fore. At China Travel Outbound we would love to help you devise your PR strategy, but to kick things off, we have listed below four practical things you might like to think about, followed by a shameless plug!

1. Regional variations in the Chinese press
In Beijing, state owned media is very powerful, but outside the capital private media companies have an important voice. Make sure your PR strategy stretches across both different ownership models and takes into account the regional variations across Chinese ‘tier one’ cities. As in the west, there are different travel publications with journalists specialising in leisure, business, meetings and incentive travel; you, or your Chinese PR agency, should target relationships with travel journalists accordingly.

2. Think digital media
If you ride the Beijing subway, you will see very few commuters reading traditional print media, but you will see plenty of eyes glued to screens. Importantly this doesn’t just apply to newspapers but to magazines as well. The Chinese are more advanced than the west in their adoption of online media.

3. Integrate social media
Use Chinese social media (not Facebook or Twitter which are blocked) to provide a regular drip of newsworthy items to keep your brand top of mind. Social media plays a more important role in travel choice than in the west, with travellers very ready to follow recommendation from friends, family bloggers and other online influencers. Bragging rights are also an important dynamic which shouldn’t be ignored – particularly if your product has appeal to high net worth Chinese travellers. Speak to us about which are the right social media for your product.

4. The power of Chinese celebrity
If you have the budget, celebrity endorsement of your product is a great way to instantly get your brand profile. China Travel Outbound has a great network of Chinese movie stars and other celebrities and we would be delighted to talk to you about who might be a good match for your product.

5. The Shameless Plug!
As you might have guessed, we have PR travel specialists in China waiting to help you. Meet Kathy Chen, our Director of PR. Kathy is a former travel journalist, who also has ‘client side’ experience, having joined China Travel Outbound from Tourism Ireland. Kathy therefore has a wealth of knowledge on the Chinese travel PR scene and a smart phone brimming with contact details of Chinese travel journalists.

Kathy Chen, our PR Director - based in our Beijing office
Kathy Chen, our PR Director – based in our Beijing office

For more information of how China Travel Outbound can help you with your Chinese PR strategy (or any other marketing and representation matter), please contact [email protected]