Top 7 Apps Chinese Outbound Tourists Use Overseas – Part 1: Getting Around

Chinese travellers taking selfie

Chinese tourists don’t just use their smartphone apps to plan and book trips overseas, they also rely on these applications when they arrive at their destination. 85% of Chinese millennials use their mobile phone while travelling overseas to further research the destination’s best tourism hotspots, help make their travel experience in an unfamiliar destination more comfortable and convenient, and keep in touch with family and friends back home.

If you’re familiar with the China market, you may know that Facebook, Twitter, and even Google Maps are banned in China. China have their own alternative apps that functionally serve similar purposes, but have interesting and different features to their Western counterparts that help facilitate ease of travel for Chinese tourists in overseas destinations.

So, what are the top mobile apps Chinese tourists use when travelling overseas that we should be paying close attention to? And, most importantly, how do they help Chinese travellers? With the recent four-day Labour Day holiday expected to produce over 160 million Chinese travellers, we thought this to be the ideal time to explore this trend to highlight the importance of mobile apps in shaping the Chinese outbound travel experience.

In the first part of this article, we explore the most popular apps that help Chinese tourists navigate around and interact with the destinations they’re visiting.

There’s WeChat, but also its Mini Programs

WeChat app logo

You may know that Tencent’s messaging platform, WeChat, is China’s most popular social media app, having achieved an unprecedented 1 billion daily active users at the end of 2018. While primarily used to communicate with friends, family and colleagues, it’s so much more than a messenger app. From scheduling doctors’ appointments, playing games and booking taxis, WeChat has in many ways become a fundamental part of the lives of Chinese citizens.

Before travelling, Chinese tourists use WeChat to seek inspiration for their travels, sharing ideas with friends in group messages and researching official accounts of hotels, retailers and attractions to weigh up their options on where to stay and visit. When WeChat users follow a travel brand’s official account, they receive push notifications when an update is posted to the account. This allows travel brands to communicate directly with and demonstrate their China Welcome to potential Chinese travellers through marketing material – a powerful tool to show Chinese tourists why you’re worth their time.

WeChat mini programs

Further developing its ecosystem, in 2017 WeChat introduced its ‘Mini Programs’, applications that can be accessed through WeChat without the need to install them separately. Every day, 230 million of the platform’s daily active users use one of WeChat’s 2.3 million Mini Programs. Many popular Chinese travel apps such as Mafengwo and Qyer (more on them in part 2) have Mini Programs, but in recent years, travel brands have observed an opportunity to improve the visitor experience of their destination or attraction for Chinese tourists by developing their own Mini Program.

Recently, the world’s tallest building, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa, launched their own Mini Program, allowing WeChat users to book tickets to the building’s observation decks and access audio content in Mandarin explaining key information about the sight. The building also launched its own WeChat mini game, the first attraction to do so outside China, all to enhance the experience for its Chinese guests.

Destinations throughout the world are catching on to the benefit of Mini Programs. Sweden, whose popularity among Chinese tourists has been lagging behind many of its Scandinavian neighbours, hopes to remedy this with the launch of their Mini Program “Explore Stockholm”. The program is an in-depth Mandarin guide of the city, providing information on its top hotels and shopping destinations and recommending 24-hour and 48-hour itineraries for short-stay travellers. Furthermore, VisitScotland’s Mini Program aims to show Chinese travellers that there’s so much more to see than just Edinburgh. The program makes it easier for Chinese travellers to discover Scotland’s unique culture and immersive outdoor experiences, and includes an interactive map highlighting the breadth of key points of interest across the county.

Creating your own Mini Program not only goes a long way to improving your China Welcome, but it’s also of great benefit to potential Chinese visitors. For Chinese travellers, being able to access detailed travel information about destinations and attractions through only a single application, content also created solely with a Chinese audience in mind, means WeChat’s Mini Programs are extremely valuable tools in helping Chinese travellers discover a destination’s unique sights.

WeChat Pay and Alipay – The rise of the digital wallet

WeChat pay

It’s no secret that Chinese tourists love to spend their hard-earned cash overseas, and they prefer to do so through mobile payments. WeChat Pay and Alipay, the two major payment platforms vying for market dominance, allow users to pay for goods and services using their digital wallet. In the eyes of many Chinese travellers, mobile payment apps are safer and more convenient to use overseas as they don’t need to worry about carrying foreign currency on-hand or fiddling around in their wallets to find a credit card. In 2018, Chinese outbound tourists paid for 32% of their transactions using mobile payments, surpassing cash payments, and 60% of Chinese visitors to Europe identify mobile payments as their preferred payment method.

Efforts to rollout acceptance of Chinese mobile payments on a global scale are being undertaken. According to WeChat Pay itself, the payment method is now accepted in 49 markets outside of mainland China and supports transactions in 16 currencies. And in 2018, the number of merchants accepting WeChat Pay increased 700% year-on-year, which demonstrates a global interest in taking the extra steps necessary to accommodate the China market. 

Alipay logo

Furthermore, 500 restaurants across Australia recently partnered with a new Alipay platform which will allow Chinese customers to scan in-restaurant QR codes, order from digital menus translated into Mandarin, and pay for meals using their phone. This is a dedicated effort that understands the value of convenience for the Chinese traveller. In addition, Chinese tourists may also be enticed to spend more with a merchant if their favourite payment method is accepted – the average budget for Chinese outbound tourists increased to 6,026 USD per person in 2018.

China’s enthusiasm for the digital wallet is transforming the way tourists are expecting to pay for goods and services overseas. When merchants accept WeChat Pay and Alipay payments, they are also demonstrating a willingness to welcome Chinese customers. Speak to us about how your business can start to accept WeChat Pay and Alipay.

Baidu Maps – Alternative to Google Maps

Baidu map

Since Google Maps is blocked in China, Baidu Maps is the app Chinese residents rely on throughout their daily lives for directions and up-to-date travel information. Baidu Maps has a few features Google Maps lacks, such 3D maps search, which lets you easily find the location of venues above ground level. You can also use Baidu Maps to book tickets to see a film showing at a cinema located near you.

In recent years, Baidu Maps has been rolling out its service across 150 countries and hopes that, by 2020, 50% of its users will be located outside of China. As a result, many businesses are beginning to recognise the importance of establishing a solid presence on the app. Yext, a brand management platform, recently integrated Baidu Maps to enable its partner businesses to provide Chinese outbound travellers with accurate and up-to-date information when using the app overseas. In addition, Sydney Airport became the first organisation outside of China to introduce indoor Baidu Maps when it did so in 2017, allowing users to see gates, check-in counters and retailers through the app.

Having accurate and up-to-date information about attractions, hotels, shops and restaurants on Baidu Maps will help encourage Chinese travellers discover more of what your destination has to offer. 

Next week, the second part of this series of articles will explore the key apps Chinese tourists use to plan and research their destination, both prior to travel and once they’ve arrived, and how they use these apps to discover different perspectives on the best places to shop, eat, stay and visit.

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Integrated Chinese trade and media campaign for London North Eastern Railway

You may remember the incredibly talented KOL and illustrator, Liu Huan (pen name Queenio), from one of our articles last year about her trip to the UK. We were so impressed with her unique travel blogs which are brought to life by her vibrant illustrative style that we invited her to collaborate on a new campaign with London North Eastern Railway (LNER).

The purpose of the project was to highlight to Chinese tourists planning their next trip abroad that there is more to the UK than its iconic capital – our country boasts many fascinating destinations up the East Coast to Scotland, all with their unique charm and history, and the best way to visit them is by train. Huan landed in London and journeyed up the country in first-class luxury, stopping at Lincoln, Leeds, York, Harrogate, Durham, Edinburgh and Inverness, experiencing their essential sights and attractions. She even made it to the Isle of Skye.

The Trip

In addition to LNER, we worked with twelve partners to craft an exciting and eventful nine-day itinerary for Huan, including the tourist boards Visit Lincoln, Visit Leeds, Visit York, Visit Harrogate, Visit County Durham, and Visit Scotland, City Cruises, The London Eye, Holiday Inn Stratford City, Westfield Shopping Centre, Rabbie’s Tours and RHS Harlow Carr Gardens.

During the trip, Huan took hundreds of photographs showcasing each city’s sights and attractions. She adds vivacity to her favourite photographs by illustrating her cartoon persona within the frame, interacting with the environment around her. Cartoon Huan can be seen perched atop the balcony of Leeds Grand Theatre playfully re-enacting ‘The Nutcracker’ performance with her dolls, embracing her inner wizard at Platform 9 ¾, and enjoying the tranquillity of Harrogate’s Turkish Baths.

Following the trip, Huan produced an in-depth travelogue documenting her train journey with LNER and the destinations visited, which is now live on China’s key travel review sites. The blog is brimming with high-quality writing and photography showcasing to Chinese internet users the appeal of the UK’s beautiful countryside and historic cities.

Results

The travelogue, which has been published on Mafengwo, Ctrip, Qyer and Tuniu, has so far received a total of 45,000 views across the four platforms. It has over 650 likes and 470 saves, demonstrating the keen interest among Chinese travellers for UK themed content. Tuniu and Qyer Forum (where Qyer’s travel articles are published) promoted the travelogue to their front pages which greatly increased its exposure, and Qyer tagged the piece as ‘Essential’, recommending it to Chinese internet users as a high-quality article about UK travel. We are expecting the travelogue to continue gaining traction on these platforms as it grows to become a popular and reliable source of information about travel to the UK.

Furthermore, Huan shared her travel experience across 19 social media posts published on her personal WeChat and Weibo accounts where she has 50,000 followers. Many of these posts have received great engagement among Chinese internet users.

The Brochure

Upon her return to China, Huan produced a 24-page Chinese brochure for LNER promoting the services of the train operator and all the destinations and attractions she visited on the trip. This will be distributed at sales calls with media and travel trade in China and at promotional events and trade shows throughout 2019, further expanding the promotion of LNER and its destinations and demonstrating the company’s commitment to the China market. We are also planning to provide the brochure to Chinese tour operators launching LNER products in the future.

Travel Trade and Media Workshop

The brochure was also given to attendees of an LNER workshop held in Beijing and entitled “Taste of the Train Tour”. 30 selected travel agents and operators, and 10 travel media attended the event, held in a trendy café venue in central Beijing. Companies represented included media outlets National Geographic Traveller, Sina.com.cn and Time Out Beijing and tour operators Ctrip, Youpu Travel and GoEuro. Laetitia Beneteau, LNER’s Business Development Manager, introduced LNER’s services to the representatives, and Liu Huan herself came along to deliver a presentation about her experience travelling from London to Scotland. The representatives also enjoyed immersing themselves in the UK by experiencing the scents of different UK’s cities, produced by renowned perfume brand, Charm Kaiser.

Output from the event included 10 pieces of editorial about LNER and its new Azuma trains, which are coming on line this year. Laetitia maximised her time in Beijing on a tailormade sales mission and she was escorted to meetings at the offices of travel trade partners by China Travel Outbound’s team.

The campaign has been posted on LNER’s Weibo account which now boasts over 35,000 followers.

Bon Voyage! Chinese tourists are setting sail

7 million Chinese tourists are estimated to be travelling abroad during the upcoming Chinese New Year, but who’s to say they will be travelling by plane? With the rapid growth of China’s FITs who seek fulfilling and authentic travel experiences, cruise trips are gradually becoming a popular way for Chinese tourists to see the big blue world. With China’s biggest holiday on the horizon, we thought this to be a great opportunity to analyse this trend, identifying the key cruise operators providing cruise trips for Chinese travellers, where Chinese tourists take cruises, and how to accommodate them on-board.

The market has potential

It’s an exciting time for China’s cruise industry – the country’s cruise liners are beginning to realise they need to go further afield to satisfy their customers. As the industry continues to develop, it is expected to become “the largest cruise market in the world.” This will depend on whether the industry can harness the huge potential of the Chinese travel market, who made an estimated 140 million overseas trips in 2018.

It is estimated that the capacity of China’s cruise lines will decline 4.4% in 2019. The two major reasons for this are the knock-on effect of 2017’s Chinese travel ban to South Korea, and the absence of routes with diverse destinations – the majority of cruises setting sail from China’s coasts stop off in South Korea and Japan, missing out exciting Southeast Asian destinations such as the Philippines and Vietnam. This is to say, despite the demand, cruises from China simply lack the variety of destinations enjoyed by cruise trips around Europe and North America.

In response, many companies are making considerable efforts to bring Chinese holidaymakers overseas to embark on their first cruise experience. Royal Caribbean Cruises was the top ranked brand in a ‘Best Experiences’ customer satisfaction survey, conducted by brand experience agency Jack Morton, where Chinese consumers were among the 6,000 surveyed. Furthermore, the brand is among the most popular in China’s cruise industry, and in 2019, they will launch their Spectrum of the Seas cruise line that aims to provide high-quality experiences “specifically tailored to Chinese guests.” The cruise line, which will sail from Barcelona to Shanghai across a 51-night voyage, will entertain over 4,200 guests with virtual reality experiences, luxury dining offering both Chinese and Western cuisines, and the largest indoor sports and entertainment complex ever to set sail. This level of commitment to the China market by such a major brand is testament to the huge potential of the China cruise market.

Costa Group Asia, a major cruise operator in Europe and Asia, will launch its first ship designed specifically for the Chinese market in 2019. The Costa Venezia aims to provide an immersive Italian experience for Chinese travellers and its 5,100 passengers with boutique shops selling goods from luxury Italian brands, a theatre evocative of Venice’s iconic Teatro La Fenice and an atrium inspired by St. Mark’s Square. The cruise will set sail on a 53-day voyage in March 2019 covering the Mediterranean, the Middle East, Southeast Asia and East Asia.

Furthermore, Costa Cruises are evidently committed to improving their ‘China Welcome’. In 2018, the company partnered with football club Juventus to provide unique “football at sea” experiences especially for Chinese guests boarding its Costa Serena cruise liner. The experiences include the Juventus Museum decorated with trophies and club memorabilia, and a mini football academy for children to hone their skills. In addition, in 2017, Costa Serena was the first Costa Cruise to allow Chinese guests to pay using Alipay mobile payments.

Likewise, Princess Cruises, owned by the same corporation as the Costa Cruises Group, announced in December 2018 that it will introduce Alipay and WeChat Pay mobile payment systems on its North American cruises, being the first cruise liner to do this. Thus, if cruise companies want to welcome more Chinese travellers on-board, they need to show that they are making an effort to accommodate them. This is evidently paving way for competition between the major cruise companies who are acknowledging the potential of the China market and are targeting Chinese tourists with unique experiences offered only by their cruises.

Indeed, exciting, one-of-a-kind experiences like these are exactly what travel and culture hungry Chinese tourists are looking for, and could go a long way to bringing Chinese tourists away from airport terminals and back to the docks. Approximately 2.5 million Chinese outbound global travellers took cruise trips in 2017, but this is expected to rise to 8-10 million by 2025.

Venturing to the End of the Earth

Over the past few months, you may have seen a plethora of articles about a growing number of Chinese travellers embarking on cruises to Antarctica. Today, China is Antarctica’s second-largest tourism market, having welcomed 8,273 Chinese visitors in the 2017-18 season, and approximately 90% of Chinese tourists visiting Antarctica choose to travel there via cruise (only 1%  directly fly to the South Pole). Perhaps the credit lies with Ctrip who provide nearly 200 Antarctic products on their platform and over 20 ships to choose from.

However, this adventure isn’t cheap, and appeals largely to group travellers who can afford to take extended time out of work. Figures from 2018 indicate Chinese tourists spent an average of 23 days on Antarctic tours, spending between $7,000 and $16,000 USD. Nevertheless, it seems money is no object for Chinese tourists looking for unusual yet fulfilling experiences that deliver ‘face’ status – on Ctrip, most Antarctic cruises for January and February have sold out, and the agency has increased its Antarctic products by 30% this year to meet the demand. This reinforces that unique travel experiences like these are becoming increasingly more important to Chinese travellers.

River cruises are making huge waves in accommodating Chinese guests

Idyllically cruising down one of the world’s most famous rivers and taking in its beautiful scenery is a popular travel experience, and certain river cruise companies are recognising the huge potential of attracting Chinese tourists to these experiences. In 2016, Viking Cruises announced its first step in the China market by dedicating two of its Europe river ships for Chinese travellers. The ships, which both set sail in 2017 along the Rhine and Danube rivers respectively, were fully staffed with Mandarin-speakers who made up all their hotel crew, included Mandarin signage, and a cuisine designed by a ‘Master Chef China’ judge. Furthermore, each ship assigned eight Mandarin guides to groups for their ground programs.

Viking were this committed to their ‘China Welcome’ to ensure their Chinese guests’ concerns about the language barrier, transportation and food and services were eliminated, and it seems to have paid off. Both cruises are still running, with Viking dedicating 100 tours for them in 2018, and the company now expects its cruises targeting Chinese travellers to account for half of their European river cruises in the future. Chinese guests on Viking’s Mandarin-language cruises can now also join a dedicated WeChat group to receive updates and share photos taken during the trip with each other.

This shows that, if their travel needs are accommodated for, there is an innate desire among Chinese travellers to experience a variety of destinations in the luxury and comfort of cruise tours, and there is definitely huge potential for them to become one of the authentic travel experiences they crave.

Chinese tourist spending – opportunity for land and sea

Chinese tourists have a strong spending power for duty-free shops; 40% of Chinese travellers purchase duty-free goods with an average receipt of $232, higher than the $146 global average. China’s cruise industry seems to have acknowledged this, and is redeveloping its cruise terminals to match the quality of services the best airport terminals provide. Shanghai’s Wusongkou International Cruise Terminal is undergoing redevelopment to transform into a “potential tourist attraction” itself, replacing its once solitary duty-free store with a duty-free shopping complex stocking high-end goods. Furthermore, the city plans to introduce linkages between cruises, airlines, trains and buses, to not only improve convenience of travel but to encourage Chinese tourists to visit the cruise terminal for their shopping needs alone. Perhaps overseas destinations should acknowledge this redevelopment and capitalise on Chinese tourists’ spending power by looking to provide more, and better, shopping facilities at their cruise ship ports (and if they accept Chinese mobile payments, even better!).

Reeling it in

As cruise companies are becoming increasingly aware of the opportunities arising from China’s outbound tourism market, competition has ensued to ensure their ‘extra steps’ to accommodate Chinese travellers are being recognised inside-and-outside the industry. Perhaps this is why Viking Cruises’ Chinese traveller focused river cruises are the most publicised and prominent in their field – it will be interesting to monitor whether competing river cruise operators will follow suit and introduce more Mandarin-language services. Cruise companies can use all the PR they can get when it comes to the China market.

One way to promote your Chinese tourist friendly cruise trip would be through hosting an influential Chinese Key Opinion Leader, who could not only blog about the wide variety of destinations visited throughout the journey, but most importantly, describe in detail the facilities and services on the cruise that accommodate Chinese guests and where these can be improved. If an influential KOL tells their audience “this particular cruise line makes the extra effort with its Chinese guests” in a blog that reaches the home pages of China’s key travel platforms, this would no doubt put them on the radar for adventurous Chinese travellers.

If you are interested in finding out more about marketing your cruises to the Chinese, including the benefits of hosting a Chinese KOL, please feel free to contact us for a chat.

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A Child’s Guide to Chinese New Year Traditions

China’s biggest holiday of the year, Chinese New Year (Monday 4th – Sunday 10th February) is just around the corner, and many Chinese tourists will take the week-long break as an opportunity to travel abroad with friends and family. According to Ctrip, over 400 million Chinese people will travel during the holiday, and 7 million of them will travel abroad. The OTA estimates that, during the holiday, Chinese outbound tourists will travel to over 900 destinations in 96 countries worldwide. Popular non-Asian destinations this year include Australia, Italy, the UAE, New Zealand, the UK, and Spain.

Our Travel Trade Manager, Maria Wang, was asked by one of our clients to compile some information for her young daughter about how Chinese people celebrate Chinese New Year. Maria’s response was so sweet and insightful that we thought we would share it here.

How the Chinese celebrate the new year

Chinese New Year

All Chinese students enjoy the Spring Festival as part of their winter vacation, which lasts approximately one month, usually from the middle of January to mid-February. Students in colleges enjoy a longer vacation than others, who stay out of school for, on average, almost a month and a half.

The Spring Festival is the most important festival in China; it marks the beginning of a new year in the China Lunar Calendar, which has about a one month gap with the regular calendar. It also means the coming of the next Zodiac sign, which consists of 11 different animals and a dragon. For instance, right now we are in the year of dog, after the spring festival of 2019,  we’ll be in the year of the pig.

The image below shows the animals and their respective Zodiac sign. They are: Mouse/ 鼠(Shǔ), Ox / 牛(Niú), Tiger/ 虎(Hǔ), Rabbit/ 兔(Tù), Dragon/ 龙(Lónɡ), Snake / 蛇(Shé), Horse/ 马(Mǎ), Sheep/羊(Yánɡ), Monkey/ 猴(Hóu), Rooster / 鸡(Jī), Dog / 狗(Gǒu), and Pig / 猪(Zhū).

Traditions

Chinese New Year

There are various traditions in the celebration of the Spring Festival. Different areas and religions have different traditions, even several traditions have been introduced in the last decade or century. I can describe several traditions we have in Beijing at the moment.

Some of us, especially the elderly, start their celebrations from the 23rd day of December in Lunar calendar. We call this day “小年” (xiǎo nián), which means “little year”. From this day to Chinese New Year’s Eve, we make different preparations for the celebration every day, including cleaning rooms, make stew, etc. One of them is to change a New Year picture (年画nián huà). We patch this on the door to ward the house from evil things.

We put this on the window, which means 年年有余(nián nián yǒu yú). 有means ‘to have’, 余means ‘abundance’ or ‘prosperity’. It is pronounced similarly to 鱼(fish). The image below says ‘may you have more prosperity year after year’.

Chinese New Year

New Year’s Eve

At Chinese New Year’s Eve, almost all the family enjoy a family time together; this is what we call “大年”(dà nián), meaning “big year”. YEAR, in the Chinese character (年nián) is actually a monster in Chinese myth, and the celebration of the Spring Festival is also called “pass(过) the year (年)”. The family stay together to enjoy food and watch TV until the eve of 12 o’clock, which means we have successfully defeated the monster.

At midnight, we would eat Chinese dumplings together too. If you can speak Chinese, you will understand the obvious reason. Dumplings (饺子jiǎo zi) has the similar pronounciation and tone as Jiaozi (交子jiāo zǐ), which is the time of midnight we used in the past.

Red envelope (红包hóng bāo) is another tradition in the Spring Festival, whereby the elderly usually give their children and grandchildren red envelopes with money in. We call the money 压岁钱(yā suì qián), 压means press, 岁means age, and 钱means money, and you can see this from its literal meaning that giving money is a kind of wish. In the past, the younger generation gave red envelopes with money to their parents and grandparents, so as to press the age from growing older. Nobody knows when this tradition reversed.

Before giving the red envelope, the young generation need to kowtow to the elderly, and say something wishful. We call it 磕头(kē tóu) – the word “kowtow” may come from it.

Chinese New Year

For adults, the Spring Festival lasts 7 days, from Chinese New Year’s Eve to the 6th day of January of the Lunar calendar. We could go visit for Temple Fairs (庙会miào huì) which are held across different parks, to enjoy food and play games. We could celebrate this festival until the 15th day as traditions say. We call this day 正月十五 (zhēng yuè shíwǔ) – 正月(zhēng yuè) means the first year in the Lunar calendar, and十五(shíwǔ) means 15. The northern part of China has the tradition to eat 元宵(yuán xiāo), and the southerners eat 汤圆(tāng yuán).

A list of new year greetings:

Happy New Year and all the best: 恭贺新禧,万事如意。(gōng hè xīn xǐ ,wàn shì rú yì)

Happy New Year: 恭贺新年。(gōng hè xīn nián)

Wishing you prosperity: 恭喜发财。(gōng xǐ fā cái)

Peace all year round: 岁岁平安。(suì suì píng ān)

May all your wishes come true: 心想事成。(xīn xiǎng shì chéng)

Everything goes well:吉祥如意。(jí xiáng rú yì)

Wishing you every success: 一帆风顺。(yī fān fēng shùn)

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145 million Chinese tourists travelled overseas last year, but how did they make their hotel or accommodation choices?

The Chinese are quite cautious when selecting accommodation for their next overseas trip. Security is a top priority, and they also want to feel comfortable and welcomed in the accommodation they choose. Services like Mandarin staff, Chinese-language hotel information booklets and restaurant menus, and accepting Chinese payment apps go a long way to helping achieve this.

However, the Chinese hotel experience has evolved in the past few years, with increasingly more Chinese tourists choosing to stay in apartments or homestays rather than high-end hotels. Many high-end or luxury hotels are fighting back this trend by improving their hotel’s ‘China Welcome’ and image of offering of ‘a home away from home’ for Chinese tourists.

This article seeks to identify how hotels are adapting to the changing needs of Chinese overseas tourists, why different kinds of accommodation are popular among different demographics, and the importance of websites and applications Chinese tourists use to book their accommodation in informing their decisions.

Homestays provide a more authentic travel experience

The rising popularity of room and apartment rental booking platforms such as Airbnb and Xiaozhu in China have transformed the landscape of online accommodation booking. According to Nielsen’s 2017 Outbound Chinese Tourism and Consumption Trends Report, 53% of China’s post-90s generation tourists favour homestays, inns, and guesthouses over hotels due to their eagerness to throw themselves into unique and authentic experiences. For some destinations, these accomodation types have become their preferred choice — this is the case with Japan where 64% of Chinese tourists choose to stay in homestays.

Similar findings were exposed in Hotels.com’s recent Chinese International Travel Monitor, which published the results of interviews with over 3,000 Chinese residents, aged between 18 and 58, who travelled abroad between May 2017 and May 2018. The report found that throughout this period, 55% of travellers stayed at independent hotels compared to 49% who opted for international hotel chains, and 33% chose boutique hotels. Furthermore, 56% of travellers cited “living in atypical accommodation” as a great travel experience, which demonstrates that not only is their accommodation choice a significant part of their travel itinerary, but they see independent hotels as providing a gateway into what makes the destination unique and exciting to visit.

Chinese tourists value the security of staying with a recognisable hotel brand

This isn’t to say Chinese tourists disregard hotels entirely; in fact, many choose to stay at international hotel chains due to their universal standards and reliability. International hotel chains uphold a quality of service that is (usually) replicated by all of their hotels worldwide, so Chinese tourists not only know exactly what they’re paying for, but see their services as specifically catering to overseas travellers.

Hyatt, in particular, has caught a whiff of this as it plans to double-down on its presence in China by introducing 60 hotels and 22,000 more rooms in the next four years. This is presumably in the hopes that the Hyatt brand will become more familiar in the Chinese market and thus tourists will choose to stay with them over a lesser-known hotel.

Furthermore, some hotels brands have partnered with influential Chinese travel platforms to help with their brand promotion. Radisson Hotel Group and Ctrip announced a strategic partnership in October that aims to expand the hotel group’s properties to more destinations and to help develop China as the group’s key source market.

Following suit is NUO, a home-grown Chinese hotel brand that hopes to expand its locally recognisable hotels globally into cities including Rome, New York and London. NUO’s Director of Marketing Communications, Cindy Zhu, claims the company’s goal is to expand into “each major city around the world” to comfortably accommodate Chinese national leaders on overseas visits.

These points show the importance of making your hotel brand more recognisable in China, to demonstrate your commitment to providing a good ‘China Welcome’ and willingness to accommodate Chinese guests.

Acknowledge the differences in how Chinese guests interact with hotels

While many of us may just search for the best and most affordable places to stay in our chosen destination, there’s a lot more that Chinese tourists take into account when selecting their accommodation.

In speaking about how hotels can improve their communication with potential Chinese customers, Yearth Alliance founder and CEO, Joseph Xia, said due to Chinese guests’ reliance on technology and information easily accessible from their mobile device, the “digitisation of hotel’s content, promotions, [and] payment method would help guests save their time” when booking accommodation. This digisation is important to consider as, if given the option, over 90% of Chinese outbound tourists would use mobile payments overseas. By introducing mobile payments alone, your hotel will put it on the map to the large section of Chinese tourists who base their travel decisions on whether their destination of choice accepts these payment methods.

Marriott International is a huge player who seems to have acknowledged the benefits of digitising their content as, this June, they readied 1,500 of their hotels worldwide to begin accepting Alipay mobile payments. This coincided the brand’s redesigned storefront on the Chinese travel platform Fliggy (owned by Alibaba, same as Alipay) to showcase to Chinese travellers their 6,000 hotels across 30 global brands in a user-friendly and accessible manner. The global hotel brand also employs Mandarin-speaking staff and offers a range of tailored services to Chinese tourists as part of its “Li Yu” initiative to welcome them in open arms.

KOLs are key

Marketing your accommodation brand through Chinese travel KOLs is a fantastic way to increase your exposure on China’s premier travel review platforms. China’s most popular KOLs have built fanbases of millions of followers through their credibility in providing top-quality and trustworthy travel recommendations. Demonstrating that your hotel comfortably accommodates the savviest of Chinese travellers can result in extremely valuable promotion in the China market.

We have worked with a number of accommodation providers on Chinese KOL and media trips who recognise their value and have facilitated their stay with complimentary rooms, in return for exposure in travelogues published on platforms such as Mafengwo, Qyer and Ctrip. Native Places, who offer long and short stay serviced apartments in London and other UK cities, have worked with us on a number of trips, and the KOLs and media have detailed how personal and homely their spaces feel. Likewise, The Grand in York, the city’s most luxurious hotel, has successfully hosted a number of high-profile KOLs and media FAM trips over the years, showing their commitment to providing a positive ‘China Welcome’.

Independent hotels have a big opportunity

So, what about luxury independent hotels? Do they have a chance in this market? The answer is certainly yes.

If you combine the Chinese tourists’ quest for luxury with their quest for authenticity, the opportunities for success are huge. This is particularly true where hotels cater well for affluent, multi-generational Chinese families, travelling independently and seeking comfort for grandparents and new experiences for treasured children.

Admittedly, independent hotels are unlikely to have access to the marketing funds of a Marriott or Hilton, but a strong presence on China’s major review sites, press coverage, hosting KOLs and media, a WeChat or Weibo account, and engaging with the Chinese travel trade will all go a long way in attracting Chinese guests.

Where does this leave us?

Your Chinese guests have vastly different expectations and needs to your Western guests, so your accommodation brand will need to make the extra effort to show that you’re ‘China Ready’. The importance of introducing mobile payments, Mandarin-language services and hosting KOLs cannot be understated, but also making sure the Chinese market recognises your efforts in accommodating Chinese guests is paramount. As such, digitising your content especially for Chinese tourists, and ensuring you have active presence on China’s review site platforms, will help keep you in the minds of Chinese tourists when they plan their next trip abroad.

If you are interested in the benefits of attracting more Chinese visitors, please contact us for a chat.

Enjoyed this article? Then these may also be of interest to you:

Watch and Go – How do TV and film influence Chinese travellers?

2019 Guide to Chinese National Holidays and Trade Shows

Chinese tourists and the Great Outdoors – let’s explore

Two Chinese KOLs travel the UK with London North Eastern Railway

This will be our last article for 2018, so from all of us at China Travel Outbound’s Brighton and Beijing offices, thank you very much for reading and we hope you have a very merry Christmas and a happy new year!

2019 Guide to Chinese National Holidays and Trade Shows

2019 is shaping up to be another fantastic year for Chinese outbound tourism, but which are the key dates you need to know for next year’s diary?

We’ve listed some of the most important dates in the Chinese calendar, including (in red) the public holidays.

If you are promoting your travel brand in the China market, you can also find below a list of China’s most important trade shows for 2019 and details about each event. We hope you find it useful!

2019 Chinese National Holidays:

Sunday 30th December 18 to Tuesday 1st January 19: New Year Holiday

Monday 4th February to Sunday 10th February: Chinese New Year Holiday/ Spring Festival

Chinese New Year is on Tuesday 5th February

Friday 8th March: International Women’s Day – Half-day off for women

Friday 5th April to Sunday 7th April: Ching Ming Festival

Monday 29th April to Wednesday 1st May: Labour Day Holiday

Saturday 4th May: Youth Day

Saturday 1st June: Children’s Day

Friday 7th June to Sunday 9th June: Dragon Boat Festival

Thursday 1st August: Army Day

Friday 13th September to Sunday 15th September: Mid-Autumn Festival

Tuesday 1st October to Monday 7th October: National Day Holiday

2019 Trade shows in China:

Guangzhou International Trade Fair

Dates: Thursday 21st to Saturday 23rd February

Location: China Import & Export Fair Pazhou Complex, Guangzhou, China

Description: This trade show, considered one of the most important B2B and B2C annual travel fairs in the Asia-Pacific region, focuses on outbound and inbound travel as well as MICE. In the past, the event has accommodated over 980 exhibitors and 140,000 visitors.

China Outbound Travel & Tourism Market

Dates: Monday 15th to Wednesday 17th April

Location: New Hall, National Agricultural Exhibition Center, Beijing

Description: This trade show has been held since 2004 and remains the only business event focusing solely on the Chinese outbound tourism market. The event welcomes over 4,000 Chinese trade buyers and new destinations exhibit every year, with Poland, Romania, and Qatar among those involved in the 2018 show. Find out more at: http://www.cottm.com

ITB China 2019

Dates: Wednesday 15th to Friday 17th April

Location: Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Center, Shanghai

Description: ITB China started in 2017 and has since grown to become one of the most essential travel fairs to attend in China. The fair is a three-day B2B travel exhibition focusing on the Chinese travel market, inviting over 850 buyers from Greater China and industry professionals worldwide. Find out more here: http://www.itb-china.com

Shanghai World Travel Fair

Dates: Thursday 18th to Sunday 21st April

Location: Shanghai Exhibition Center, Shanghai

Description: Over 750 exhibitors and 62,000 trade and public visitors attend this show to be informed of the latest developments in the tourism industry and network with industry professionals. Find out more at: http://www.worldtravelfair.com.cn/en/

Beijing International Travel Expo (BITE)

Dates: Friday 10th to Sunday 12th May

Location: China National Convention Center, Beijing

Description: BITE has been operating since 2004 and welcomes thousands of participating exhibitors from over 80 countries and 30 Chinese provinces. It has become a world-renowned platform for information exchange, trade and exhibition in the China tourism industry. Find out more at: http://www.bjbite.com/index.php?m=about&a=index&qh=1&cid=1&aid=2

IBTM China

Dates: Wednesday 28th to Thursday 29th August

Location: China National Convention Center, Beijing

Description: This is an important travel fair for business meetings, conventions and incentive travel, attracting over 5,000 industry professionals representing hotels, event agencies, convention centers, and event companies worldwide. https://www.cibtm.com

Beijing International Travel Market (BITM)

Dates: Wednesday 4th September to Thursday 5th September

Location: China International Exhibition Center, Beijing

Description: This premier travel fair presents a great opportunity for destinations, attractions, tour operators and airlines to established relationships with Chinese businesses and promote their services. A great event to attend for organisations looking to enter the Chinese travel market.

Travel Trade Market (TTM)

Dates: Tuesday 10th to Thursday 12th September

Location: Century City New International Convention & Exhibition Center, Chengdu

Description: First launched this year, Travel Trade Market will return in 2019 to bring together over 300 buyers and 150 exhibitors from China and worldwide to network and create business opportunities. The tradeshow specialises in inbound and outbound travel of China and seeks to establish a presence for international exhibitions in the Chinese tourism market. Find out more here: http://www.ttmchina.com.cn

Chengdu International Tourism Expo (CITE)

Dates: TBC – likely November or December 2019

Location: TBC

Description: CITE is the leading tourism exhibition in Chengdu for tourism industry professionals promoting travel packages, destinations, products and services. The platform seeks to provide a one-stop platform for industry professionals to establish business relations and explore new opportunities while expanding their existing professional network. Find out more here: https://www.citechina.asia

Destination Britain China

Dates: TBC – likely November 2019

Location: TBC

Description: This is a fantastic event for UK-based tourism businesses looking to conduct business with China and Hong Kong’s top tour operators. Find out more here: https://trade.visitbritain.com/destination-britain-china/

Key Findings from the Chinese Tourism Leaders’ Dinner 2018

During this year’s World Travel Market, we hosted our annual Chinese Tourism Leader’s Dinner in collaboration with Capela China, welcoming an audience of senior travel and tourism professionals representing UK attractions and tourist boards to discuss recent market trends and share success stories about their marketing in China. Guests included representatives from Gatwick Airport, Lake District China Forum, Marketing Manchester, London North Eastern Railway, English Heritage and Experience Oxfordshire.

Once again, we were delighted to welcome Professor Dr Wolfgang Arlt, Director of the China Outbound Tourism Research Institute (COTRI), who delivered an insightful presentation on key trends to follow and traps to avoid in the Chinese tourism market. Marketing Manager for Royal Museums Greenwich, Amy O’Rourke, presented to guests about the four museums’ journey with the Chinese market and announced 15% of their visitors to the Royal Observatory are now Chinese FIT tourists, up from a figure of 4% when the brand started working with China Travel Outbound.

This article will identify key findings from the dinner that shed light on the emerging opportunities in the Chinese tourism market, and how businesses can take advantage of the market’s growth to attract more Chinese tourists to their destination or attraction.

Chinese border crossings are on the rise

COTRI found that from January-June 2018, 80 million border crossings have been made by Chinese tourists with more than 40 million tourists travelling beyond Greater China – this marks a year-on-year increase of 16%.

Chinese global arrivals will continue to increase rapidly

It is estimated that 160 million Chinese arrivals will be welcomed globally in 2018, with 85 million of these trips made to destinations outside Greater China.

COTRI forecasts by 2030, Chinese travellers will make 390 million outbound trips from Mainland China. This means, in the next decade, half of all additional outbound travellers will be Chinese.

The majority of Chinese people have yet to travel abroad

Since fewer than 10% of Chinese people have passports, the majority of China’s 1.4 billion population have yet to experience an outbound trip outside of China. For those that have travelled, 75% see it as vital to improving their overall happiness and quality of life.

Destinations should value quantity over quality

FIT travellers are becoming increasingly more important to destinations than package tour groups, even if they don’t realise it. While tour groups visit on mass, bringing many people to a destination and thus helping to increase overall visitor numbers, they receive merely a taster of the destination compared to FITs who want to stay longer and spend more to fully experience its authentic sights.

It’s easier than it’s ever been for Chinese tourists to travel abroad

Visa restrictions for Chinese tourists have relaxed in recent years, with most destinations catching on to recent market growth and welcoming them with open arms. Now, 27 destinations allow visa-free entry for Chinese citizens while 39 offer visas on arrival.

Don’t assume the needs of the Chinese tourism market are the same as other markets

It’s important to recognise how different Chinese tourists to other global travellers. Destinations or attractions shouldn’t assume that what works for their visitors coming from Europe, America or Africa, will work for their Chinese visitors. Florida, known for its world-class theme parks and family attractions, only welcomes 3% of the US’s Chinese arrivals.

Recognise the value of your destination

Chinese tourists love the bragging rights that come with visiting luxury destinations. However, these destinations are under pressure from Chinese tour operators who want to make them more accessible by lowering their prices, which can compromise what makes these destinations so attractive for Chinese tourists in the first place. This happened with the Maldives which welcomed 305,000 Chinese arrivals in 2017, down from 365,000 in 2015.

Advice for attractions – stick with the market and improve your ‘China Welcome’

With our guidance, Royal Museums Greenwich pursued a number of on-site activities to welcome more Chinese tourists to their attractions. These include the inclusion of the Mandarin audio guides at the Royal Observatory, which eliminates language barriers to allow Chinese visitors to enjoy one of the world’s top astronomy museums.

In 2016, RMG introduced UnionPay to its Royal Observatory shop to accept payments from Chinese visitors. UnionPay has now been overtaken by WeChat Pay and Alipay which the museum is in the process of adopting this year. Allowing Chinese visitors to pay using their own card, or via mobile payment apps, goes a long way in making an attraction more accessible.

Promoting yourself through a representative in China is vital, as is being patient with the market. Use social media and the power of influential KOLs to promote to the growing FIT consumer, and make sure your brand is properly represented online. Ms O’Rourke told the audience that the Chinese outbound tourism market is a slow one, but one that eventually pays off through dedication and a willingness to adapt your brand to its unique needs.

Thank you to all who attended the dinner and shared their insights on the market.

If you are interested in being involved in one of our Chinese KOL trips, please contact us for a chat.

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Watch and Go – How do TV and film influence Chinese travellers?

Two Chinese KOLs travel the UK with London North Eastern Railway

On behalf of London North Eastern Railway, we welcomed two influential Chinese travel KOLs to the UK on a cross-country trip back in June 2018.

One of the KOLs was Wang Yuan, the Chief Editor of one of China’s premier fashion and lifestyle apps, MOGU Street Lifestyle, which has over 160 million registered members. This social commerce app targets affluent millennials interested in fashion and attracts approximately half a million daily visitors. Wang Yuan manages two popular Weibo accounts – her personal account has over 160,000 followers and her Weibo, dedicated to the food she enjoys on her travels, has more than 421,000 followers.

Our other blogger was Liu Bo, a prolific travel KOL and lifestyle writer who has over 10 years’ experience working at Madame Figaro Magazine and other top media groups. Her personal Weibo account has over 260,000 followers, who include fashion and lifestyle media, world-class restaurants, hotels and resort groups. Her WeChat account has a global fanbase of more than 186,000 followers.

In order to create an exciting travel itinerary with visits to attractive UK destinations, we worked with eighteen partners who helped make the trip a success. These include the tourist boards, Visit York and Visit Scotland, Marketing Edinburgh, tour operator, Jacobite Tours, London attractions Royal Museums Greenwich, City Cruises and Household Cavalry Museum, and our accommodation partners including Hotel Café Royal, Ardconnel Court Apartments, Eagle Brae, and The Dunstane Houses.

Throughout the nine-day cross-country trip, the pair travelled in luxury on London North Eastern Railway’s world-class train service.  The KOLs immersed themselves in the lived history of York and enjoyed beautiful landscapes and essential attractions in Inverness and Edinburgh. They then travelled down to London to stay at the iconic Hotel Café Royal where they indulged in their one-of-a-kind afternoon tea experience. While exploring the capital, the pair sailed down the Thames on a City Cruise, saw breath-taking views from atop the London Eye, had a great day out at Royal Museums Greenwich, and met the Queen’s Horses at the Household Cavalry Museum.

Results

The KOLs had a fantastic time on the trip and this reflects in their passionately detailed travel blogs and social media posts. They published a staggering total of 43 Weibo posts and 21 WeChat posts throughout the trip for their travel loving followers to enjoy and be inspired by. The reach of their Weibo and WeChat posts exceeds over 1 million social media followers.

Liu Bo filled her social media posts with stunning collage images providing a snapshot of the attractions she enjoyed in each given destination.

Wang Yuan wrote and published a detailed travel guide on her MOGU Street Lifestyle app; on average, articles published on the app receive 1 million views. This was accompanied by two extensive Weibo articles about the trip which to date have combined total views of over 67,000.

In addition, Liu Bo shared an in-depth WeChat City guide with her followers about the destinations she visited via London North Eastern Railway, which has been viewed nearly 25,000 times and has 169 likes.

One important finding from this trip was that, when two people travel together, the photo and sharing results are increased as, naturally, friends like to photograph each other! Wherever the budget will allow, we highly recommend inviting two bloggers to travel together.

 “Thank you for arranging the trip for us. It was an amazing and fantastic trip for us to learn more about the UK” – Liu Bo.

If you are interested in being involved in one of our Chinese KOL trips, please contact us for a chat.

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Chinese KOL Trip from London to Scotland by Rail (Case Study)

Taiwanese Superstar Nana Ou-yang Visits Bristol (Case Study)

Join our Chinese Media Hospitality List

We have launched a new opportunity for British hotels and restaurants to host visiting Chinese media, travel bloggers and Key Opinion Leaders. Our Chinese Media Hospitality List will include a maximum of five hotels in each town or city to be contacted with opportunities to host Chinese media and VIPs visiting the UK.

There will be no charge to join the list, but participating hotels must be of a standard equivalent to 4 star or above, and be able to deliver against certain criteria including the provision of a free full breakfast option and at least two nights’ free of charge accommodation per trip (subject to availability).

Restaurants are also invited to sign up. Restaurants are required to deliver free of charge meals including wine and soft drinks. The restaurant list will have no maximum but opportunities to host will be determined by itineraries.

Across the spring and summer of 2018, we organised trips for 14 KOLs and media to the UK on behalf of their tourism clients, with still more planned. Each hosting hotel received the benefit of exposure in top magazines and websites, such as National Geographic Traveler, Mafengwo and Qyer. In many cases, hotels and restaurants also featured within posts on the Chinese social media platforms, WeChat and Weibo.

Car rental companies, rail providers, domestic airlines, Mandarin-speaking tour operators, and private transfer providers are also invited to get in touch to register their interest in supporting future trips.

If you are interested in joining the Chinese Media Hospitality List, please download and complete the contact form and email it across to [email protected]

Get Ready for 7 Million Chinese Tourists

National Day Golden Week, celebrating China’s National Day, is one of the country’s longest national holidays, lasting from Monday 1st to Sunday 7th October this year. Similar to Chinese New Year, it is also an extremely popular time to travel for the Chinese, with many taking advantage of the rare week-long break to enjoy a relaxing vacation at home or abroad. But what evidence is there to suggest that this year’s Golden Week will be huge, and how can travel brands prepare for and take advantage of the potential influx of Chinese tourists?

What happened with Golden Week 2017?

The success of last year’s Golden Week put the national holiday on the global map and cemented its significance. 705 million domestic tourists travelled around China during the eight-day break in 2017, around half of China’s 1.4 billion population, and tourism income reached 583.6 billion yuan (£64.71 billion). These figures represented a year-on-year increase of 11.9% and 13.9% respectively – huge results for a rapidly growing tourism sector.

In terms of overseas travel, it was estimated that around 6 million Chinese tourists travelled abroad, visiting 1,155 cities in 88 countries or regions. One of the most popular destinations was Russia, as well as Southeast Asian destinations including Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore and Malaysia. Czech Republic and Hungary were also popular destinations, and on the whole, Belt and Road countries benefitted from the holiday.

During this holiday period, Chinese travellers abroad tended to travel independently rather than in group tours, and they were looking for unique experiences rather than luxury outlets to spend their cash with, perhaps making the most of their relatively short travel time to visit essential, authentic attractions. For example, In France Chinese visitors frequented idyllic villages and museums as opposed to the traditional tourist sites, and in the US, they mainly attended shows and basketball games.

That’s not to say they didn’t go shopping; data from WeChat found that over Golden Week 2017, 52% of outbound Chinese tourists shopped at duty free retailers. Restaurant and retail spending was also staggering, reaching 1.5 trillion yuan (£166 billion) over the holiday period. Chinese tourists who travelled to the UK for Golden Week spent £29 million with retailers and £11 million in London alone. Tourists were likely drawn to the UK for its cheap pound due to the previous year’s Brexit vote.

Figures concerning accommodation bookings made during this period also shed light on the holiday’s success. Airbnb recorded a 32% increase in overseas bookings during the period, and Tujia, a Chinese online vacation rental site targeting the country’s middle to high-end travellers, witnessed a 400% year-on-year increase in their bookings, and an average per room per night spend of 557 yuan (£61) during Golden Week.

Gear up for 7 million tourists

While that all sounds brilliant, what are the predictions for 2018’s Golden Week? We’re very fortunate that this year, Chinese citizens could potentially take sixteen-days’ worth of holiday, which is more than enough time to comfortably travel to and experience an international destination. This is because the Mid-Autumn Festival, the national holiday held on Monday 24th September, gives Chinese citizens a 3-day weekend, and if the rest of the week is taken off, it will roll into Golden Week commencing on 1st October. Is there a better time for Chinese tourists to travel abroad!?

Roughly 7 million Chinese tourists will travel internationally during Golden Week this year, accounting for approximately 5% of the year’s total number of Chinese outbound tourists. The top short-haul destinations are likely to be Japan, Korea, Thailand, while for long-haul, the US, Russia and the UK are expected to attract the bulk of international travellers.

It seems like Chinese tourists really want to make the most of this extended break; 30% more Chinese travellers than last year have decided to take off the last week of September. Furthermore, despite reports that outbound travel prices during National Day have risen up-to 30% year-on-year, Chinese travellers seem unfazed by this as almost all flights for the booking period have sold out, and only economy seats remain on available international flights.

We can expect great things from Russia this Golden Week – the country has recently attracted record numbers of Chinese tourists to their shores. From January to July 2018, Russia saw a 150% increase in Chinese visitors compared to the same period in 2017. Obviously, the FIFA World Cup was an influencing factor in this, having alone welcomed 50,000 Chinese tourists.

Likewise, the UK may be a popular destination of choice as it has seen significant growth in Chinese tourist numbers over the past few years. The country welcomed 337,000 Chinese tourists in 2017, a 29% increase from 2016, and spending was up 35% at £694 million. Furthermore, Chinese tourists spent $2707 (£2060) per arrival to Britain in 2017. This is more than the average spend of Chinese outbound travellers, which about 7,300 yuan (£810), and over three-times that of the average tourist visiting the UK.

There is some evidence suggesting the UK may have a great Golden Week this year. According to Ctrip, the average prices for UK packaged tours during Golden Week fell 20% year-over-year, and the majority of tours were fully booked a month before.

Other destinations are making a considerable effort to prepare for and reap the benefits of Golden Week. Tourism Toronto has launched a Golden Week campaign with Alipay allowing Chinese users to redeem special offers via the app for participating retailers and attractions in the Canadian city.

Surely, from these statistics, we can expect great things from Golden Week for these destinations. But only time will tell…

How to prepare for Golden Week

Golden Week is a fantastic opportunity to show how ‘China Ready’ your travel brand is, and your eagerness in accommodating the rapidly growing Chinese market. If you’re a retailer, Chinese tourists will expect to be able to pay for items abroad using mobile payment apps such as Alipay and WeChat Pay, so introducing these services may entice them to spend more with you. Mandarin shopping directories, Chinese-language restaurant menus, and Mandarin-speaking staff will go a long way to improving your ‘China Welcome’, and word will get around quickly on Chinese social media about your efforts to accommodate Chinese visitors.

With the pace Chinese global tourism has been growing recently, we can only hope for another thriving Golden Week!

If you are interested in the benefits of attracting more Chinese visitors, please contact us for a chat.

Enjoyed this article? Then these may also be of interest to you:

Selecting Travel KOLS: How do we choose our bloggers?

Chinese tourists and the Great Outdoors – let’s explore

Explaining Chinese Payment Systems – What’s the fuss about?

Watch and Go – How do TV and film influence Chinese travellers?